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McShane of TSBT
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Word Facts

Unread post by McShane of TSBT » Sun Jul 16, 2017 9:43 am

What’s the Difference Between “Discreet” and “Discrete”?

This is another pair of homophones (words that sound alike but are different in meaning, spelling, or both) that can be very confusing. Discreet implies the showing of reserve and prudence in one’s behavior or speech. Discrete means something quite different: “distinct, separate, unrelated.”

Both words derive from the same Latin word discretus meaning “separated.” Until the 1700s, these words were each spelled many different ways including discrete, discreet, dyscrete, discreete, etc. Eventually discrete and discreet came to be differentiated in spelling as well as in meaning. Discreet has yielded the noun discretion, but discrete‘s noun form is discreteness. For most of English history, discreet was more frequently used, but today discrete is much more frequently used than discreet; it has seen a dramatic rise since the 1940s according to Google nGram.

Want to see them in action? Here are a few real-life examples that exemplify their differences:

“They balked when the company hiked its price a few bucks a month, and they absolutely howled when Netflix tried to separate DVD rentals and online streaming into two discrete services.” –Matt Peckham, “Netflix Was Right, and We’re Being Fickle,” Time, October 25, 2011

“The beans, too, are not the usual congealing muddle, but discrete drops of heirloom yellow-eyes, scented with coriander.” –Ligaya Mishan, “Salsa, Flirting With Bok Choy,” New York Times, April 3, 2014

“Munro is a great writer; a wise writer; a free and brave, exacting, transformative, generous, and profoundly discreet writer.” –Gish Jen, “Alice Munro, Cinderella Story,” The Daily Beast, October 12, 2013

“It makes sense because texting is more discreet and can’t be overheard…” –Lily Hay Newman,” Crisis Hotlines Now Offer Texting With Counselors,” Slate, February 10, 2014
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Re: Word Facts

Unread post by Bryan » Sun Jul 16, 2017 8:01 pm

And thus begins the lesson on why English is tough to learn :lol:

Good thread Pete ... it should be interesting.
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Re: Word Facts

Unread post by McShane of TSBT » Mon Jul 17, 2017 10:36 am

10 Interesting Facts About the English Language that You Didn't Know

Did you know that enneacontakaienneagon is actually a word in the English language? (And you thought pronouncing supercalifragilisticexpialidocious was difficult?). In fact, the meaning of the word is just as bizarre as the word itself: it’s a shape with ninety-nine sides.

Compared to other languages, English may seem simple, but that is probably because most people don’t realize it is full of crazy inventions, misinterpretations, mistakes, strange words, and needless words!

Let’s take a look at ten interesting facts about the English language:

1. “I am” is the shortest complete sentence in the English language.

2. A pangram sentence is one that contains every letter in the language.

A-pangram-sentence- For example, the sentence “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog” is a pangram.
Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious (*breath*) is NOT the longest word in English.

3. Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious- This extra long word (that approximately means “fantastic”) was popularized by the movie Mary Poppins and was eventually added to the dictionary. What you probably didn’t know is that there is a word that is longer—yes longer—than this one. Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis is a type of lung disease caused by inhaling ash and dust. Go ahead and try pronouncing that!

4. There are “ghost words” that mean nothing.

There-are-“ghost-words” Believe it or not, there are some words that appeared in the dictionary because of printing errors. The nonexistent word “dord” appeared in the dictionary for eight years in the mid-20th century. It became known as a “ghost word.”

5. The shortest, oldest, and most commonly used word is “I.”

The-shortest,-oldest---I- Medieval manuscripts reveal that some of the oldest words in English are “I,” “we,” “two,” and “three.” This makes “I” one of the shortest and oldest words in the English language. It is also the most commonly used word in English conversations.

6. A new word is added to the dictionary every two hours.

every-two-hours.- Between now and your next meal, a new word will be put into the dictionary. During the course of the year, almost 4,000 new words are added! So, the next time you try to catch the attention of the dissertation committee, try adding some new words to your project.

7. There’s a name for words that we repeat often.

name-for-words-that-we-repeat Words we always use even though they add no meaning or value to a sentence are called crutch words. For example, in the sentence “Then I was like, OMG, then like, he went there, and like…” it is pretty obvious that “like” is the crutch word. “Actually,” “honestly,” and “basically” are also commonly used as crutch words.

Editorial. We in Australia tend to follow the United States who do not have an official language. It amuses me when my relatives visit us and say: "Excuse me, I need to use your Bath Room". We have a separate room for nature calls that we call" "Toilet or "WC" or even Dunny for an Outhouse. I often wondered if they were in a hurry would they use the shower recess to releave themselves? OMG, Man, that's cool, like its unreal. Yes, we have no problem using four letter word in our daily media but hesitate using the word: "Shithouse" derived from the German word Schitenhouse (?spelling) because it is not polite. The word faeces of course is also restricted to childrens use.

8. Swims will be swims even when turned upside down.

Swims Such words are called ambigrams.

9. English is the language of the air.

English-is-the-language-of-the-air This means that all pilots have to identify themselves and speak in English while flying, regardless of their origin.

10. Girl used to mean small boy or girl.

Girl-used-to-mean-small-boy-or-girl The word “girl” was not initially used to refer to a specific gender. It used to mean “child” or “young person” regardless of the gender.
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Re: Word Facts

Unread post by beckser » Mon Jul 17, 2017 3:01 pm

Cool set of interesting facts! I am really into English languages (generally all languages) so it is always great to get some new information.
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Re: Word Facts

Unread post by McShane of TSBT » Tue Jul 18, 2017 11:29 am

Amazing Word Facts:

Did you know that: To "testify" was based on men in the Roman court swearing to a statement made by swearing on their testicles.
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Re: Word Facts

Unread post by McShane of TSBT » Wed Jul 19, 2017 11:09 am

Amazing Word Facts:

The longest word in the English language, according to the Oxford English Dictionary, is pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis.

The only other word with the same amount of letters is
pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconioses, its plural. (I am glad that copy and paste is simple)
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Re: Word Facts

Unread post by Bryan » Wed Jul 19, 2017 11:29 pm

Yeah, try typing that without misspelling it!
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Re: Word Facts

Unread post by McShane of TSBT » Thu Jul 20, 2017 3:48 am

Bryan wrote:
Wed Jul 19, 2017 11:29 pm
Yeah, try typing that without misspelling it!
Actually I did just that. I had to type the first instance and without checking spelling, I copied and pasted the second part, just changing one letter and that was the time when I discovered that I had a typo in the first part. :-)

I also practiced saying it for these are the type of questions are used in trivia type games and at home circles as well. That is also a waste of time for at my age, you ask me that tomorrow and I would have forgotten it by than.
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Re: Word Facts

Unread post by McShane of TSBT » Thu Jul 20, 2017 9:32 am

Los Angeles's full name is "El Pueblo de Nuestra Senora la Reina de los Angeles de Porciuncula" aand can be abbreviate to 3.63% of its size, "L.A."
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